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    #1

    who or whom?

    I want to know which sentences are correct? "who did you see" or "whom did you see".

    "whom is she with" or "who is she with"

    I want also to know when we can use who and whom.

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: who or whom?

    Say:

    Who did you see?
    Who is she with?

    For a lot of people there is no necessity for using "whom" at all.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: who or whom?

    There is a necessity for punctuation though, if you're going to write it.

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    #4

    Re: who or whom?

    natshaklil, click here and scroll down to the sixth entry to read lots of earlier answers to your question.

    I found this page for you by typing your thread title in the Google Custom Search box near the top of the page.

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: who or whom?

    You'll find that many or most people do not use whom in casual conversation and writing. It's going the way of carbon paper and telephone booths.

    But it's still considered standard English, in the same pronoun family as him, her, us, and them.

    So use whom when you're writing a serious essay or article, making a speech at the UN, or trying to impress people with your perfect English.

    Otherwise, it's not important and will make some people think you're a snob.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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