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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    'alongside' or 'accompanied by'

    Dear all,

    I have the following sentences:


    • In-depth knowledge of private sector development alongside a keen interest in corporate finance and M&A.
    • In-depth knowledge of private sector development accompanied by a keen interest in corporate finance and M&A.


    Will you please tell me whether alongside and accompanied by are used appropriately in this context? I would also appreciate if you could suggest me some alternatives? I think with is a viable option but due to its frequent use in the rest of my paragraph, I avoid it.

    Thank in advance

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    #2

    Re: 'alongside' or 'accompanied by'

    Neither of those phrases is a sentence. Accompanied by is probably more appropriate but it's impossible to know without seeing a complete sentence.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: 'alongside' or 'accompanied by'

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Neither of those phrases is a sentence. Accompanied by is probably more appropriate but it's impossible to know without seeing a complete sentence.

    Thank you for your response and drawing attention to the error. This phrase is a part of the personal statement section on a resume, and it stands on its own. Given this, I am trying to find the most appropriate wording

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 'alongside' or 'accompanied by'

    They're both a little stilted. "Along with" would sound much more natural to me.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  4. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: 'alongside' or 'accompanied by'

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    They're both a little stilted. "Along with" would sound much more natural to me.
    but


    Many thanks for your suggestion. I also thought of using along with but the preceding phrase in my paragraph also includes with. Please see below. Therefore, I try to find another word to avoid repetition.


    PhD graduate with 5+ years' experience in research, data analysis and modelling. In-depth knowledge of private sector development alonside/accompanied by a keen interest in corporate finance and M&A

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: 'alongside' or 'accompanied by'

    and
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Newbie
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    #7

    Re: 'alongside' or 'accompanied by'

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    and

    Thanks!

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: 'alongside' or 'accompanied by'

    There's no reason to combine one element arbitrarily with another.

    You could write (with the appropriate heading):
    • PhD graduate with 5+ years' experience in research, data analysis and modelling
    • In-depth knowledge of private sector development
    • A keen interest in corporate finance and M&A


    There's no more reason that 2 and 3 should be put together than that 1 and 3, or 1 and 2 should be.

  8. Newbie
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    #9

    Re: 'alongside' or 'accompanied by'

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    There's no reason to combine one element arbitrarily with another.

    You could write (with the appropriate heading):
    • PhD graduate with 5+ years' experience in research, data analysis and modelling
    • In-depth knowledge of private sector development
    • A keen interest in corporate finance and M&A


    There's no more reason that 2 and 3 should be put together than that 1 and 3, or 1 and 2 should be.

    Thanks a alot. Unfortunately, I cannot use bullets due to space restrictions. Plus, 2 and 3 need to be together: corporate finance and M&A are elements of private sector development.

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