Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Jan 2016
    • Posts: 224
    #1

    a tiny sliver of high-growth companies

    Hi everyone -

    When I was reading an article from the Economist, I found this sentence that I don't understand. Could anyone help me with it?

    "The Kauffman Foundation, which researches such matters, has shown that the bulk of new jobs come from a tiny sliver of high-growth companies."

    What does a tiny sliver of high-growth companies mean? I've looked up the word "sliver" in a dictionary, but I still have no idea what it's talking about here.

    Here is the link of the article: http://www.economist.com/news/busine...crazy-diamonds

    Thanks!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,285
    #2

    Re: a tiny sliver of high-growth companies

    It means a very small fraction of the total number of companies. A sliver is a tiny slice. Imagine a pie-chart showing the growth rates of companies. According to the article, the companies represented by a tiny slice on the chart (showing companies with the highest growth) create most new jobs.
    I am not a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,845
    #3

    Re: a tiny sliver of high-growth companies

    While the meaning is clear, it does strike me as an odd way of saying it.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,285
    #4

    Re: a tiny sliver of high-growth companies

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    While the meaning is clear, it does strike me as an odd way of saying it.
    The Economist uses its own idiom. I guessed the quoted text's origin without having to read the post.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #5

    Re: a tiny sliver of high-growth companies

    And I think the pie-chart idea was right on the money. Whether or not there‘s one in the article itself you can bet the writer has seen a few! As Tdol says, it‘s an odd word to use - unless you have a pie-chart in mind. ;--)

    b
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Twitter: @BobK99
    Blog: http://harmlessdrudgery.blogspot.com
    Books: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bob-Knowles/..._athr_dp_pel_1

Similar Threads

  1. In companies
    By honeyhoney in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Jan-2013, 13:31
  2. "Dull sliver barrel"; what does it mean?
    By toril in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 14-Jun-2011, 14:20
  3. [Grammar] two big renowned companies
    By Will17 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-May-2011, 10:03
  4. every cloud has a sliver linning
    By Unregistered in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Nov-2007, 18:59

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •