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    #1

    comment or degree adverbs?

    Hello,
    Could you, please, tell me which type of adverbs are in these sentences?

    She just walked out and she didn't even say goodbye.
    are the 'just' and 'even' degree adverbs or comment adverbs?

    You reacted very calmly, but actually you're not a calm person. Is 'actually' a comment adverb here?

    When you are on the last couple of lines, just look up at the audience. What type of adverb is 'just' here?

    Thank you very much in advance

  1. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: comment or degree adverbs?

    If this is homework, you are not going to get any answers. Your teacher wants to know what you can do, not what we can.

    If it's not homework, please tell us what you think first. Then we can comment your answers.
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: comment or degree adverbs?

    Hello,
    Thank you for the replay.
    It's not homework, I'm just trying to make sense of that.(Find the grave the dog is buried, as we say in my country) But apparently I can't.
    Here is what I think, which is most likely wrong:

    She just walked out and she didn't even say goodbye.
    It seems to me that 'even' here can be a manner adverb, because it describes how she walked out. And just I think might be too.

    You reacted very calmly, but actually you're not a calm person. - maybe a comment adverb, because you are giving your opinion


    Wen you are on the last couple of lines, just look up at the audience. - I'm completely lost here. Could be manner or degree. I've no idea which one.




    If you don't mind, please help me
    Thank you for your time

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: comment or degree adverbs?

    I don't find this sort of thing useful. You can classify adverbs however you like, though. Some are obvious, like time and place. Others are completely arbitrary. New types keep popping up here every month when someone detects a semantic nuance.
    "Actually" is an adverb of factuality. "Just" could be either an adverb of time "He just walked out (just then)", or of mereity*. (He merely walked out").

    *Not a real word.

    What's a comment adverb?

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    #5

    Re: comment or degree adverbs?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post

    What's a comment adverb?
    Are you foolishly implying that I don't know the answer to the question you so provocatively asked?

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: comment or degree adverbs?

    Embarrassingly, I suspect that the two adverbs I used in my last post are probably adverbs of manner.

    Fortunately, I gave up worrying about this years ago.

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    #7

    Re: comment or degree adverbs?

    The question Raymott and Piscean are playfully discussing is: how does knowing which category an adverb falls into help anyone?

    Do you find a practical value to knowing this, or is it just a matter of general interest?
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: comment or degree adverbs?

    Don't get me wrong. I have no problem with people who take an interest in this sort of thing. I have my quirks too!

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    #9

    Re: comment or degree adverbs?

    Quote Originally Posted by elenah View Post
    Hello,
    Could you, please, tell me which type of adverbs are in these sentences?

    She just walked out and she didn't even say goodbye.
    are the 'just' and 'even' degree adverbs or comment adverbs?

    You reacted very calmly, but actually you're not a calm person. Is 'actually' a comment adverb here?

    When you are on the last couple of lines, just look up at the audience. What type of adverb is 'just' here?

    Thank you very much in advance

    "Just" is a focusing modifier whose meaning here could be roughly glossed as "and do/did nothing else". Its focus in your first example is the verb phrase "walked out", and in your last example it's the verb phrase "look up at the audience".

    "Even” is also a focusing modifier, but it contributes an extra component of meaning: it indicates a stronger or more surprising feeling about the situation. Its focus is the verb phrase “say goodbye".

    "Actually" with the meaning "in fact" is probably a degree adverb modifying the entire clause "you're not a calm person".
    Last edited by PaulMatthews; 18-May-2016 at 14:47.

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    #10

    Re: comment or degree adverbs?

    Yes, I need to know why things are like they are. I probably have OCD. What can you do about things like that?

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