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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    It's like a steambath.

    When it's sultry weather, how do you say?
    Yesterday, the temperature went up to 31 degrees celcius unlike as usual.

    It's like a steambath.
    It's like an oven.

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: It's*like*a*steambath.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    When it's sultry weather, how do you describe it? say?
    Yesterday, the temperature went up to 31 degrees Celsius unlike as which was quite unusual for this time of year.

    It's like a steambath.
    It's like an oven.

    It was so stuffy; almost like being in a sauna.
    Mind you, 31 Celsius doesn't sound that hot at all.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: It's*like*a*steambath.

    'Sultry' means hot and humid. That's not like an oven, but it could be like a steambath or a sauna.

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: It's*like*a*steambath.

    In Korea, in the peak summer season, it's humid hot, while in the same period of the year, it's dry hot in Canada, where I used to live.
    In Korea, they say "it feels as if we were in a steamer or steam bath." Is it incorrect for humid hot weather?

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    #5

    Re: It's*like*a*steambath.

    "It's like a sauna" is how I would say it.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 19-May-2016 at 18:09. Reason: Fixing typo.

  5. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: It's*like*a*steambath.

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    Mind you, 31 Celsius doesn't sound that hot at all.
    Maybe not in Iraq, but it's close to hot for May in Spain!
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: It's*like*a*steambath.

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "It's like a sauna" is how I would say it.
    "Sauna" works well for hot and dry but a sauna isn't steamy.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. Piscean's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: It's*like*a*steambath.

    I have been in some very steamy saunas. The steam comes from water being thrown onto hot stones.

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: It's*like*a*steambath.

    If the stones are hot enough, that steam should evaporate almost instantly, raising the dry temperature in the (small) room. In a steam room, the steam should be so thick, you can barely see the person sitting next to you!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: It's*like*a*steambath.

    I think most here would think of "steamy" when they hear sauna.

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