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    #1

    Mathematical verb that correspond to the noun 'upper bound'

    Hello,

    I'm actually writing an scientific paper in maths, and I have some trouble with some mathematical vocabulary. Especially the verb that would correspond to the noun 'upper bound' or 'lower bound'. The only translation which have been proposed to me are 'increase' or 'raise' but it does not have the same sense...
    For instance, in the expression " 2 < 5 " then 5 is an upper bound of 2. But it sounds totally false to me that 5 increase 2.
    I was thinking maybe, the term 'upper bound' can be transformed as a verb : 'to up bound something' ? But I would rather have the confirmation from a English teacher.

    Regards,
    GavrocheDesBois

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Mathematical verb that correspond to the noun 'upper bound'

    Quote Originally Posted by GavrocheDesBois View Post
    Hello,

    I'm [Delete "actually."] writing a scientific paper in maths [No, you're writing in English, not in maths.], and I'm having trouble with some mathematical vocabulary, especially the verb that would correspond to the noun 'upper bound' or 'lower bound'. ["Bound" is not a noun. "Upper" and "lower" are adjectives.]

    The only translations which have been proposed to me are 'increase' or 'raise', but they do not have the same sense...
    For instance, in the expression " 2 < 5 " then 5 is an upper bound of 2. But it sounds totally false to me that 5 increase 2. ["5 increase 2" doesn't mean anything. Can you rephrase it?]

    I was thinking maybe, the term 'upper bound' can be transformed as a verb[no space]: 'to up bound something'[no space]? But I would rather have." [Delete "the"] confirmation from an English teacher. [The phrase "to up bound something" is also meaningless. Can you rephrase it?]

    Regards,
    Gavroche [space] DesBois
    I don't know what you mean by "bound." Boundary? Limit?

    Have you tried a math forum? ("Math" is American English fro "maths."]
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #3

    Re: Mathematical verb that correspond to the noun 'upper bound'

    Thank you for the corrections Charlie,

    I link you the wikipedia page that guaranties the existence of 'upper bound' and 'lower bound as nouns
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_and_lower_bounds

    It is hard for me to rephrase something that is the heart of the question ... but I'll try. What I meant by giving you this little example was purposely to show that 'increase' or 'raise' do not match for my case.
    Maybe, the right verb to use could be 'to bound from above', but I was searching for something more compact (in my native language, we have a single word to express that "majorer").

    I'm afraid I'm looking for something too specific. In the meantime I'll take my chance on maths forums as well.

    GavrocheDesBois ( I appreciate you want to split my pseudo in two parts, but I'd rather keep it in one )

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Mathematical verb that correspond to the noun 'upper bound'

    Sorry, I thought Gavroche DesBois was your name!

    Again, I'm not a mathmetician. To me, "2 < 5" just means "two is less than five." I've never seen it used to express a range. If you've already found "upper bound" and "lower bound" in an English-language reference, that could be your answer.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #5

    Re: Mathematical verb that correspond to the noun 'upper bound'

    I can't think of the verb you're looking for, but I'll offer a tip on English. When you wrote actually, I think you were thinking of the French adverb actuellement. Sadly for Francophones, that word translates into English as currently. The English adverb actually translates into French as en fait or en réalité.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Skrej's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Mathematical verb that correspond to the noun 'upper bound'

    I think the expressions you're looking for are 'bounded above' and 'bounded below', according to this Wikipedia article on upper and lower bounds. You might read the Wiki page and see if it's talking about the same thing you're trying to express.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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    #7

    Re: Mathematical verb that correspond to the noun 'upper bound'

    Hi again,
    I hope you all enjoyed your weekend. Thanks for all those answers !
    After searching all around the web, I have the same conclusion as Skrej. I should use 'bound from below/above' for my paper.

    Last problem, I did not find out how I can put this thread as 'solved'... Any tips, or should I just edit the title ?

    GavrocheDesBois

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    #8

    Re: Mathematical verb that correspond to the noun 'upper bound'

    You cannot edit the title.

    Have you found the Thank button? Clicking on that will tell us that you are satisfied with our answers.

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