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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    five-storey

    The disastrous Hanshin earthquake in 1995 killed 6,400 people, toppled elevated highways, flattened office blocks and devastated the port area of Kobe. Yet it left the magnificent five-storey pagoda at the Toji temple in nearby Kyoto unscathed, though it levelled a number of buildings in the neighbourhood...

    What is the difference between these two? Is 1 British, while 2 American?
    1. five-storey
    2. five-story

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    #2

    Re: five-storey

    Yes, exactly.

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    #3

    Re: five-storey

    In AmE, a five-story building has five levels: the ground (or "first") floor and four more. I'm not sure whether it means the same in BrE.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: five-storey

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    In AmE, a five-story building has five levels: the ground (or "first") floor and four more. I'm not sure whether it means the same in BrE.
    A five-storey building also has five levels, in BrE, but the ground floor is called that. The top floor is called the 'fourth floor'.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: five-storey

    It depends on what the designers or users of the building choose to call each floor. I used to work in an eight-storey building. There was no "ground floor" - what I would normally call the ground floor was called "Level 1". I worked on the eighth floor which was called, unsurprisingly, "Level 8". Had the designers chosen to name the floors differently, and had used "Ground Floor" for the lowest floor, I would probably have worked on "Floor 7".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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