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  1. #1
    Lolokerry is offline Newbie
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    Slang definition for "jock" and "jok"

    Hello. I looked through definitions for words "jock" and "jok" in the dictionaries.

    "Jock" is a slang term for certain subculture, alright. But I certainly saw some scottish people using it like a swear word with definition close to "dick". Can it be used this way? Is it a common swear word?

    Urban dictionary says that "jok" means a) fight; b) slang term for fool. I need the second definition. The questions are the same. Do people use "jok" as a "fool" often?

    Are those words used often? Will people understand the offence if I use "jock" or\and "jok" as a swear words?

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Re: Slang definition for "jock" and "jok"

    I've never heard of "jok". "Jock" is a fairly derogatory term for a Scotsman. I've never heard of it as a swearword. You might be thinking of "jockstrap" which is a kind of sports underwear for men. http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...trap?a=british
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  3. #3
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: Slang definition for "jock" and "jok"

    In the US, we refer to people who play sports (more specifically, for whom playing sports if very important and perhaps the most important part of their identity) as "jocks."

    For example: In high school I was a bit of a jock, but once I got to college, I spent too much time studying to play much.


    I know this is not your question, but when an American hears "jock" this is what we usually think.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: Slang definition for "jock" and "jok"

    Depending on context, I would assume it was using Barb's definition or the derogatory term for a Scottish person. I don't know of any other meanings.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Slang definition for "jock" and "jok"

    Quote Originally Posted by Lolokerry View Post
    Do people use "jok" as a "fool" often?
    I would use jerk for that meaning. I haven't come across jok. (English BrE speaker)

  6. #6
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Slang definition for "jock" and "jok"

    In the US, a jock is an athlete. I've heard it used in a Scottish folk song to mean Scot, but it's not used that way here by native English speakers.

    Less common, Americans in the radio broadcasting business call on-air music hosts jocks - short for disk jockey.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Slang definition for "jock" and "jok"

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    I've heard it used in a Scottish folk song to mean Scot, but it's not used that way here by native English speakers.
    But that is a long way from the dick meaning.

  8. #8
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Re: Slang definition for "jock" and "jok"

    not a teacher

    Perhaps Lolokerry overheard someone being described as "a joke". Meaning a ridiculous or pathetic person.

    "He's a joke and a crook." (orlandosentinel.com)
    "It's all too easy to say he's a sad joke but who can disagree." (guardian.co.uk)

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