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    #1

    I'd still be down.

    Pretty Little Liars Movie 0 min : 54 sec https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsVww2h1KQo

    Emily: Are you coming?
    Hanna: I can't. If you're gonna slash his tires or bust his headlights, I'd still be down. But I don't want to be in the same room with him.
    Emily: I know. I get it.

    What does "I'd still be down" mean?

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I'd still be down.

    Good question!

    It's common American slang. She's still down for vandalizing his car.

    She's down for it = she's ready, she's available, she's looking forward to it, she's psyched, she's hot to trot.

    I think it evolved from writing things down on lists. For instance:
    - You: How many tomatoes will be in my vegetable order?

    - Me: I have you down [on my list] for a dozen.

    Over time, the meaning of down for has expanded. So now, if we want to do something, we often say we're down for it.

    "I'd still be down" is short for "I'd still be down for it," easily understood by a native speaker.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #3

    Re: I'd still be down.

    It's one of the slang ironies that being "down" for something can also mean that you are "up" for it.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I'd still be down.

    I'd use "up for it" in natural BrE and I have seen "down with it" before. I don't think I've seen "down for​ it" before.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: I'd still be down.

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Good question!

    It's common American slang. She's still down for vandalizing his car.

    "I'd still be down" is short for "I'd still be down for it," easily understood by a native speaker.
    Thank you very much.

    I'm not sure one more thing - is "I'd" an abbreviation for "I would" or "I had"?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 01-Jun-2016 at 22:15. Reason: Pruning quote.

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    #6

    Re: I'd still be down.

    It's I would​ in this case.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: I'd still be down.

    If "I'd" there meant "I had", you would be left with "I'd have be ...", which I'm sure you know is incorrect.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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