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    #1

    take/bring the books

    Can you .... the books with you when you come?
    A. Take
    B. Bring

    Is it the same if I write down " When you come, can you ........... the books with you?" . And it means the action " ...the books" follows " come" ( the hearer comes and then take the books to somewhere) , isn't it?

    In this case, I will use "take". I wonder if the speaker wants the action " come" to follow " ...the books" ( the hearer will take the books and then go somewhere). Is it correct if I write down " Can you bring the books with you before you come"?

    Could you explain it to me, thanks a lot.







  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: which one precedes?

    The correct answer is B: bring.
    You are coming here. So you bring things, not take them. If you were going there, you would take them. "Can you take your books when you visit Tom?"
    Yes, you can write, "When you come, can you bring the books?" "With you" is not needed, but it's not wrong.
    No, the hearer does not come first and then bring the books. It's simultaneous. Of course it's not correct to write "Can you bring the books with you before you come"? It's logically impossible to bring the books either before or after you come.

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    #3

    Re: which one precedes?

    Thank you for your explanation. You are so helpful. Now I understand the case since the two actions are simultaneous with the same place.

    But I wonder if it is correct when we write the second sentence:
    1) " Can you bring the books (here) when you come" ( the same place)
    2) " Can you take the books (to the library) when you come " ( the different places)

    It means " you come first and then you can take the books to somewhere else (not brings the books to the speaker) ", doesn't it?

    If not, and when I want someone to bring the books for me after they go to somewhere to get them. What would I say?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 01-Jun-2016 at 08:32.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: which one precedes?

    2) should be "Can you take the books (to the library) when you go?"
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #5

    Re: which one precedes?

    I have changed your thread title.


    Extract from the Posting Guidelines:

    'Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed.'

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    #6

    Re: which one precedes?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    2) should be "Can you take the books (to the library) when you go?"
    If I am on the way to the library, can I say "Tom, Can you bring the books (to the library) when you come?"

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: which one precedes?

    Yes, if you plan to see Tom at the library.

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    #8

    Re: which one precedes?

    It means that I can write the second sentence with the meaning TAKE THE BOOKS follows COME, can't I?

    1) Can you bring the book when you come. ( simultaneously)
    2) Can you take the book to the library when you come. ( come and then take the books to the library)

    I would like to know when the two actions are simultaneous and when they are in sequence.
    Last edited by Son Ho; 01-Jun-2016 at 15:29.

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    #9

    Re: which one precedes?

    You tell by the context.
    "Can you come and take the book back to the library?" This makes sense in the right context, as does your second sentence.

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