Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2015
    • Posts: 27
    #1

    "Tom loves Jane with his whole being"?

    Is the sentence "Tom loves Jane with his whole being" have the exact same meaning as "Tom's whole being loves Jane"? I want to understand the sentence without having the word "with" involved in the sentence.



    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,516
    #2

    Re: "Tom loves Jane with his whole being"?

    As you are already receiving replies in another forum, this thread is temporarily closed.

Similar Threads

  1. It was in the library that/where Jane met Tom.
    By wotcha in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Sep-2012, 22:03
  2. [Grammar] why "will", not "would" in <Jane Eyre>
    By freddie in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 13-Feb-2012, 01:51
  3. [General] "loves a good bunch up her knickers"
    By maiabulela in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-Apr-2010, 12:00
  4. [Grammar] How to answer the question "Where did Ken meet Tom?""
    By Pikarow in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-Oct-2009, 23:25
  5. A Question of "Jane and I" or "Jane and me&qu
    By hopechest in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 17-Sep-2004, 10:37

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •