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    #1

    Adverbials

    - Not a teacher - What is the most difficult part of speech for people who are learning the English language? The trickiest part for me was adverbials. Adjuncts, conjuncts, subjuncts, and disjuncts. Adverbials are essential when studying syntax. I'm probably telling you something that you already know. If so, disregard this thread.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Adverbials

    Boehm, you don't need to write "Not a teacher" if you are starting a thread. You only need to write it if you are trying to answer another learner's question.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Adverbials

    As a native speaker who first began teaching English 49 years ago, the most difficult part for me to successfully help learners with has always been how to use determiners appropriately. It's not really essential - the inappropriate use or non-use of a determiner is rarely a block to meaningful communication, but it can often be the one give-away sign of a non-native speaker.

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    #4

    Re: Adverbials

    As always, it depends- few learners or native speakers have a problem with the word yes, but the number who could correctly identify its part of speech is probably sub-minuscule. Studying classes of words may be tricky, but identifying and understanding parts of speech can, in some cases, be trickier.

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