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    #1

    due to/ due for?

    What does "due for" mean given the sentence below?


    The employee will pay one-half of his/her medical insurance premiums and the entire balance for monies due for his/her family.

    From the book "So You want to be an Insurance Agent"

    Thanks

    • Member Info
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    #2

    Re: due to/ due for?

    Does it really say "the entire balance for monies due"? It should be "of monies due".

    With that correction, it means the employee must pay the stated amount of money owed for his or her family. Monies is another way to say money, often used in a business context. As far as I can tell, the two variations are exact synonyms.
    I am not a teacher.

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