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  1. Just Joined
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    #1

    NOR or OR

    I have two questions about the clause below:

    1) I’m not sure, since this is talking in the negative, whether I should use OR or NOR, after the words ‘ruling elite’. I have looked online for the answer to this, but I'm still not that certain.

    2) Do I need to repeat the world FOR?

    I do not wish to re-phrase the clause, so I want it to give the clearest possible meaning.

    “that functions without the need for a ruling elite or for a priestly caste”

    Thank you for your kind assistance!

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: NOR or OR

    1. You need 'or'.
    2. A second 'for' is not necessary.

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    #3

    Re: NOR or OR

    You could use nor if the clause said something like ...that functions with neither a ruling elite nor a priestly caste. I usually hear or rather than nor in statements like that, but I greatly prefer ​nor.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: NOR or OR

    I believe there are good authors that use 'nor' without a 'neither' in the first clause - as long as it follows a negation.
    “... that functions without the need for a ruling elite nor for a priestly caste” sounds usable to me. In this case, you do need 'for'.
    I've been reading some Irish literature lately. It might have been in here. I'll post an example if I find one.

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