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    #1

    The phrase "I'd love to."

    I know a man uses the phrase Id love to., but I sometimes feel he might be a gay when he says it so often.
    Do you all guy members ever avoid using the phrase?
    If you dont want to use it, what phrases would use instead?

    Example: Well have a party this coming Friday night. Why dont you come along?
    Id love to.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The phrase "I'd love to."

    Quote Originally Posted by popri View Post
    I know a man uses the phrase “I’d love to.”, but I sometimes feel he might be a gay when he says it so often.
    There's no accounting for uninformed prejudice.
    Do you all guy members ever avoid using the phrase?
    I am not sure what you mean by 'you all guys'.

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    #3

    Re: The phrase "I'd love to."

    Sorry to confuse you.

    I'd just like to know what phrases men would use instead of "I'd happy to."
    I imagine some men might try to avoid using womanly words and phrases such as "Oh, my goodness!" and "fabulous!"
    Of course, it depends on how you speak. But I doubt whether he is a gay or not when he says "I'd love to." so often.
    It doesn't matter if he is a gay or not, but I'd like to know how men use the phrase.
    Like I said in the first thread, I know both men and women use it.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The phrase "I'd love to."

    I use "I'd love to" occasionally, but mostly to my sister. Usually it's in response to questions like "Would you like to come up for Christmas?" I'd say I use it more with women. (And I'm not gay.) I think you'd need more signs than that, such as tone of voice, associated gestures, and whether he prefers sex with other men. The last tends to be a giveaway!

    Don't say "a gay". It sounds terrible. You can say "He's gay" (adjective). Strangely though, "She's a lesbian" doesn't sound so bad (to me). I'd say, "I'm heterosexual", not "I'm a heterosexual".

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    #5

    Re: The phrase "I'd love to."

    Dear Raymott:

    Thank you for writing.
    One more question.
    What’s the difference between “He is a gay.” and “He is gay.”?
    It might be fussy, but I’m not a native speaker and I have no idea about the difference.
    How awful do you feel when you hear that he is A gay?
    Do you feel bothered when you hear I’m a Japanese or I’m an American?
    Or is it only a matter of gay and a gay?
    Last edited by popri; 12-Jun-2016 at 07:52.

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    #6

    Re: The phrase "I'd love to."

    Quote Originally Posted by popri View Post
    I know a man uses the phrase “I’d love to”, but I sometimes feel he might be a gay when he says it so often.
    Do you all guy members guys ever avoid using use the phrase?
    If you don’t want to use it, what phrases would you use instead?

    Example: We’ll have a party this coming Friday night. Why don’t you come along?
    I’d love to.
    "I'd love to" may sound overzealous to Asian culture but it is a common expression in English.
    You could say "I'd like to" to make it sound less passionate.

    "He is a gay" is like giving a person a label, which is kind of rude.
    "He is gay" implies a person has gay tendencies, which is a more discreet way of saying it.
    Last edited by tedmc; 12-Jun-2016 at 06:02.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: The phrase "I'd love to."

    I have never considered that someone's utterances might be a suggestion of their sexuality. That might be because I have absolutely no interest whatsoever in someone's sexuality - it's none of my business (or anyone else's)!

    I certainly don't find "I'd love to" to be anything other than an expression indicating how delighted someone would be to do something.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: The phrase "I'd love to."

    Quote Originally Posted by popri View Post
    Dear Raymott:

    Thank you for writing.
    One more question.
    What’s the difference between “He is a gay.” and “He is gay.”?
    It might be fussy, but I’m not a native speaker and I have no idea about the difference.
    How awful do you feel when you hear that he is A gay?
    Do you feel bothered when you hear I’m a Japanese or I’m an American?
    Or is it only a matter of gay and a gay?
    The first is a noun. The second is an adjective.

    The first labels him. The second describes him.

    Some people are not offended by labeling. Some are.

    "An American" and "American" are both correct. "Japanese" is correct, but "a Japanese" is not. I don't know why. It just a matter of custom.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: The phrase "I'd love to."

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I have never considered that someone's utterances might be a suggestion of their sexuality. That might be because I have absolutely no interest whatsoever in someone's sexuality - it's none of my business (or anyone else's)!
    It might be the business of someone who plans to hit on him/her. Or is that also unwarranted discrimination?

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    #10

    Re: The phrase "I'd love to."

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    It might be the business of someone who plans to hit on him/her. Or is that also unwarranted discrimination?
    Well, most people I know would be happy/flattered to be hit on by anyone! If their radar is off, we can always let them down gently.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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