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    #1

    as/like

    HI,
    Not all the information was given LIKE/AS address, cadastral data...
    Which one is correct, as or like?
    now changing the subject and talking about an auditor, are light, medium and critical common terms for an auditor's work?
    thank you

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    #2

    Re: as/like

    For examples, use like/such as, not as. How do you want to use light/medium/critical??

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    #3

    Re: as/like

    HI, thanks a lot for the help.
    The person works for a insurance company, he is an auditor, he makes some notes and after that he has to classify them as light, medium and critical, but these are the terms we use in portuguese, and I would like to know if they are the right ones in english.
    Thanks again

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    #4

    Re: as/like

    It doesn't look as if they're standard terms:
    http://www.abrema.net/abrema/in_dex.html
    http://www.ais-cpa.com/glosa.html

  1. #5

    Re: as/like

    Quote Originally Posted by carla guaraldi
    HI, thanks a lot for the help.
    The person works for a insurance company, he is an auditor, he makes some notes and after that he has to classify them as light, medium and critical, but these are the terms we use in portuguese, and I would like to know if they are the right ones in english.
    Thanks again
    It's what we do in Turkey too. To classify, I thing AS is the only choice which works in the context.

  2. #6

    Re: as/like

    Quote Originally Posted by mehmetmamger
    It's what we do in Turkey too. To classify, I thing AS is the only choice which works in the context.
    Oops I must have misunderstood you. All I wanted to express was the suitability of AS in the context. However, I have to idea about the terminological suitability of the words of light, medium or critical for the situation.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: as/like

    On it's own, 'as' doesn't work in that context. Here, 'like' and 'such as' are used to introduce an example set:

    EX: Not all the information such as (for example) ...
    such as;e.g., these separate items were not provided.

    EX: Not all the Information like (for example) ...
    like;e.g, this information was not provided.

    In such contexts, such as is close in meaning to like and may often be interchanged with it. such as introduces a list of words that do not belong to the same set, whereas like introduces a list of words that belong to the same set.

    "Strictly, such as precedes an example that represents a larger
    subject, whereas like indicates that two subjects are comparable.

    EX: Steve has recordings of many great saxophonists such as Ben Webster and Lee Konitz.

    EX: Steve wants to be a great jazz saxophonist like
    Ben Webster and Lee Konitz."

    Source

    =========
    Click here: Accounting Terminology Guide. If the terms you're looking for aren't listed, you may want to contact one of the CPA's on this list and ask them about the terms light, medium, and critical.

    All the best.

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #8

    Re: as/like

    Here's more:

    "Like or such as? Patricia O'Conner says, "It's a matter of taste--either is acceptable. To my ear, like sounds better; such as has a more formal air" (Woe Is I 103). James J. Kilpatrick argues that there is a significant difference: "When we are talking of large, indefinite fields of similarity, like may properly be used.... When we are talking about specifically named persons [places or things]...included in a small field, we ought to use such as" (qtd. in Lederer and Dowis. Sleeping Dogs Don't Lay 79). "In 'Books like this one can help you write better,' like means similar to. In 'Cities such as Atlanta and Birmingham are important to the economy of the Southeast,' the intent is to specify those cities as examples, not merely to put them into a broad category of cities that are important to the economy of the Southeast" (Lederer and Dowis. Sleeping Dogs Don't Lay 79).
    Standard usage varies a good deal, and you're safe using either."

    source

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    #9

    Re: as/like

    IT HAS BEEN SO KIND OF YOU,
    THANK YOU A LOT

  5. #10

    Re: as/like

    Light, medium and critical are likely company specific.

    Many companies will use low and high priority in place of light and critical.

    "Such as" is very formal and is very rarely used - "like" is recommended for normal communication.

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