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    #1

    Why is bread considered as uncountable noun?

    As title said.....

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    #2

    Re: Why is bread considered as uncountable noun?

    Welcome to the forum.

    It is both countable and uncountable. There are many varieties of bread. Click here.

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    #3

    Re: Why is bread considered as uncountable noun?

    Bread is usually uncountable because it's a collective noun for which individual examples can be counted. For example, I have several kinds of bread in this basket: three rolls, two croissants, and a brioche.

    Fruit
    and produce behave the same way.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Why is bread considered as uncountable noun?

    Here are three loaves of bread.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Why is bread considered as uncountable noun?

    None of the above examples of 'bread' as countable uses 'breads'.
    "Varieties, kinds, and loaves" don't make a countable noun any more than "buckets of water" makes 'water' countable.

    Note that I'm not saying that 'breads' can't be used.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Why is bread considered as uncountable noun?

    Quote Originally Posted by 카탸Katya View Post
    As title SAYS.
    Q: Why is "bread"considered an uncountable noun?
    A: Because we don't normally say "two breads".

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Why is bread considered as uncountable noun?

    I doubt 'As the title says' can be used as a complete sentence.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: Why is bread considered as uncountable noun?

    NOT A TEACHER

    Hello, Katya:

    I am not a good reader, so I probably do not understand your question.


    I do not understand why you say that "bread" is uncountable.

    I went to the "books" section of Google (where thousands of books have been digitalized for our education).

    I typed in the word "breads." Supposedly, there are 237,000 results.

    Here are just three book titles:

    The Best of Irish Breads and Baking (2005) by Georgina Campbell.

    Sourdough Breads and Coffee Cakes (1983) by Ada Lou Roberts.

    100 Great Breads (2011) by Paul Hollywood.

    *****

    I think that the following (that I have made up) is "good" American English:

    "Oh, Mona, have you ever been to the Paradise Bakery? They have the greatest breads there. I bought just three of them for you to taste."
    Last edited by TheParser; 26-Jun-2016 at 10:01.

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Why is bread considered as uncountable noun?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    I do not understand why you say that "bread" is uncountable.
    It is shown as uncountable in the following dictionaries:
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict.../english/bread
    http://www.macmillandictionary.com/d.../british/bread
    http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionarie...bread?q=+bread
    http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/bread

    Quote Originally Posted by 카탸Katya View Post
    As title said.....
    If you are thinking about “如题” in your native language, I would liberally translate it as 'Please see the title'.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #10

    Re: Why is bread considered as uncountable noun?

    Let's invite the editors of said dictionaries to justify their stance.

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