Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Dec 2006
    • Posts: 1,895
    #1

    Every time (that/when)I go to London I get caught in a traffic jam.

    1. Every time I go to London I get caught in a traffic jam.
    2. Every time that I go to London I get caught in a traffic jam.
    3. Every time when I go to London I get caught in a traffic jam.
    I think the above three sentences are all acceptable. Do native speakers agree?
    I need native speakers' help.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Apr 2016
    • Posts: 32
    #2

    Re: Every time (that/when)I go to London I get caught in a traffic jam.

    1 and 2 are both fine, no.3 doesn't work, when doesn't work as a relative pronoun here.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Dec 2006
    • Posts: 1,895
    #3

    Re: Every time (that/when)I go to London I get caught in a traffic jam.

    After common nouns referring to time, we often replace when with that. In some cases, the relative pronoun/adverb is dropped.
    You may come any time when you are free. OR You may come any time that you are free.
    I will never forget the day when I first met Jane. OR I will never forget the day that I first met Jane.
    In a very informal style, the relative pronoun can be dropped.
    I will never forget the day I first met Jane.
    You may come any time you are free.


    http://www.englishgrammar.org/that-i...hen-and-where/

    Do native speakers agree with what the above link says?
    I need native speakers' help.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Apr 2016
    • Posts: 32
    #4

    Re: Every time (that/when)I go to London I get caught in a traffic jam.

    I think it is because time is not an actual expression of time, e.g., day, week, moment, etc. in the example any time when you are free, time is a substitute for 10.00, 11.30, etc. But every time has more the meaning of every occasion. That's how I interpret it, anyway.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,317
    #5

    Re: Every time (that/when)I go to London I get caught in a traffic jam.

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    I will never forget the day when I first met Jane. OR I will never forget the day that I first met Jane.
    In a very informal style, the relative pronoun can be dropped.
    I will never forget the day I first met Jane.
    You may come any time you are free.

    <snip>

    Do native speakers agree with what the above link says?
    No. That is good, formal style. Careful speakers can save their unused relative pronouns and donate them to charity at the end of the year.
    I am not a teacher.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Jul-2012, 10:46
  2. Do you say "get caught in a traffic accident"?
    By optimistic pessimist in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Aug-2011, 07:17
  3. [Essay] topic:traffic jam-- so appreciate for your correction and suggestion
    By idealist in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-Apr-2011, 12:42
  4. Meanings: congestion and traffic jam
    By Tvita in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Feb-2008, 11:50
  5. Traffic jam or snarl-up?
    By Anna Xpomoba in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-May-2006, 08:59

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •