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  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #1

    well-to-do

    Does anyone use the word 'well-to-do' these days? (it is marked 'old-fashioned' in dictionaries)
    Last edited by englishhobby; 25-Jun-2016 at 17:23.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: well-to-do

    Some of us older speakers on BrE do.

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    #3

    Re: well-to-do

    Does anyone use it?

    Well-to-do doesn't seem old-fashioned to me, though I'd be more likely to say well off. I speak American English.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Skrej's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: well-to-do

    I agree, as a speaker of AmE I occasionally still use the phrase.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: well-to-do

    It's more common to describe yourself as "comfortable" when speaking about yourself financially - at least where I come from. You can call someone else "well off" or "well to do".
    Also: "I'm/he's doing alright."; "I can't complain" (in the right context, of course.)
    There are stronger terms used by resentful socialists.

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