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    #1

    Participle or gerund

    E (France): Iceland pulled off the biggest shocks in European Championship history by beating England 2-1 in the round of 16 on Monday, continuing the astonishing run of the smallest nation at the tournament.what parts of speech 'continuing ' belongs to? How do we differentiate gerunds from participles?
    Thanks in advance

    Regards,
    Jignesh
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 02-Jul-2016 at 12:10. Reason: Enlarged font to make post readable

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Participle or gerund

    I consider it a participle because it modifies the subject 'Iceland'.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: Participle or gerund

    In traditional grammar, a gerund is verb-form that is functionally similar to a noun, whereas a participle is one that is functionally similar to an adjective.

    (1) "Kim was concerned about [going to the concert]". (gerund)
    (2) "Kim was concerned about [the extortionate cost]". (noun)

    (3) "People [earning more than $100,000 a year] don't qualify for the rebate". (participle)
    (4) "[Moderately affluent] people don't qualify for the rebate". (adjective)

    In (1) the bracketed part is a clause with the verb "going" as its head. In (2) "the extortionate cost" is a noun phrase with "cost" as head. The similarity between the verb-form "going" and the noun "cost" is that they both head expressions with the same function, i.e. complement to the preposition "about".

    In (3) and (4) the bracketed parts are alike in that they both modify the head noun "people". In (3) the brackets surround a clause with the verb "earning" as head; in (4) we have an adjective phrase with the adjective "affluent" as head. Again, "earning" and "affluent" are thus functionally similar in that each heads an expression modifying a noun.

    Now compare your example to a similar one:

    (5) "Iceland pulled off the biggest shock in European Championship history by beating England 2-1 in the round of 16 on Monday, [continuing the astonishing run of the smallest nation at the tournament]". (participle)

    (6) "Iceland, [unbeaten in the tournament thus far], pulled off the biggest shock in European Championship history by beating England 2-1 in the round of 16 on Monday". (adjective)

    In (5) (your example) and (6), the bracketed parts are alike in that they both modify the noun "Iceland". In (5) the brackets surround a clause with the verb "continuing" as head; in (6) the bracketed part is an adjective phrase with the adjective "unbeaten" as head. Again, "continuing" and "unbeaten" are functionally similar in that each heads an expression modifying a noun.

    You see what I mean?

    Last edited by PaulMatthews; 02-Jul-2016 at 09:46.

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