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    #1

    up to her neck

    She is up to her neck in work.



    This sentence uses a metaphor to show how busy she is with her work, but I dont think its logically right. Up to means as far as. How can it be possible that she is as far as her neck. I think logically the sentence should be: her work is up to her neck. What do you say?

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: up to her neck

    The sentence is fine as it was written. The expression casts whatever someone is up to their neck in as a physical substance which can pile up till they're at risk of drowning.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: up to her neck

    Quote Originally Posted by diamondcutter View Post
    I think logically the sentence should be: her work is up to her neck.
    Yes, that could be logical. But language doesn't necessarily work logically, and certainly not with idioms. If she is literally in water that comes up to her neck, we can say that she is up to her neck in water, or that the water is up to her neck. You can't use the latter form idiomatically, ie. as you suggest for work.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: up to her neck

    There are two ways of expressing this idea in many contexts, mostly literal contexts.

    The water came up to her knees.
    She was up to her knees in the water.

    The sea came up to his waist.
    He was up to his waist in the sea.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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