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  1. Anonymous
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    #1

    They are sat at dinner.

    They are sat at dinner.


    Is the above sentence correct? If so, how does it differ from:

    They sit at dinner.

    Thanks! :wink:

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: They are sat at dinner.

    Quote Originally Posted by tianshan
    They are sat at dinner.


    Is the above sentence correct?
    No, it is not.

  3. gwendolinest
    Guest
    #3

    Re: They are sat at dinner.

    Quote Originally Posted by tianshan
    They are sat at dinner.


    Is the above sentence correct? If so, how does it differ from:

    They sit at dinner.

    Thanks! :wink:
    “Sat” is a widespread BE colloquialism for “sitting” (for example “there’s a bird sat on the fence”). This is very bad grammar IMHO, and it seems to be an exclusively BE problem. I don’t think it’s found in AE at all.

    ()

  4. Anonymous
    Guest
    #4
    Right. I've never heard here.


    We can also say: We are sitting at the dinner table.



    Does anyone do that anymore?

  5. Anonymous
    Guest
    #5

    Re: They are sat at dinner.

    Quote Originally Posted by tianshan
    They are sat at dinner.


    Is the above sentence correct? If so, how does it differ from:

    They sit at dinner.

    Thanks! :wink:

    We can say: They are sitting at the dinner table.

    They sit at the dinner table every evening at seven o'clock.

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
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    #6
    In fairly formal British English, I have heard 'sit to dinner', meaning the action of sitting at the table. :D

  7. Anonymous
    Guest
    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In fairly formal British English, I have heard 'sit to dinner', meaning the action of sitting at the table. :D
    That sounds very odd to my AE perception of English. I would tell someone that it is simply wrong. I've never heard in any context "sit to dinner". To me, it simply sounds like the wrong preposition.


  8. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
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    #8
    I don't use it, but I've heard it. I don't think I've ever taught it, either.

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