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  1. Newbie
    Interested in Language
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      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy

    • Join Date: Jul 2016
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    Smile a cup of tea

    I would like to know what does the following sentence mean (it can be found at the beginning of the Katherine Mansfield' s story " A cup of tea"):
    "....She had a duck of a boy". I presume that many foreign readers have made the same question.
    Thank you for the attention,
    Sincerely
    Salvatore Ricciardelli

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,828
    #2
    I am not a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,883
    #3

    Re: a cup of tea

    Quote Originally Posted by sricciardel View Post
    I would like to know what does the following sentence means. (It can be found at the beginning of the Katherine Mansfield's story "A cup of tea"):

    "....She had a duck of a boy".

    I presume think that many foreign readers of the book have made the same question.

    Thank you for the attention,
    Sincerely
    Salvatore Ricciardelli

    All unnecessary
    Foreign (non-native) readers aren't the only ones, probably. I have no idea what it means.

    Note my corrections above. Be careful with your spacing around punctuation. Don't put a space after an apostrophe, before the "s". Don't put a space after opening quotation marks.

    Edit: I've just seen Matthew's response and link above. However, I'm not sure that there is a connection between that use of "ducky" as an adjective and this phrase. I have never heard it used as an adjective. I have heard "ducky" and "duck" used as terms of endearment or as greetings from friends who come from Lincolnshire.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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