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    #1

    blink v. nictate v. wink

    The studio was aquarium of light; the woman and the girl blinked in the glare."

    Can we say following instead of original?

    1) The studio was aquarium of light; the woman and the girl nictated in the glare.

    2) The studio was aquarium of light; the woman and the girl winked in the glare.

    Source:
    Second Deadly Sin by by Lawrence Sanders.

    Thank you.

  1. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: blink v. nictate v. wink

    If my memory serves me correctly the verb "wink" means to close and open one eye quickly, typically to indicate that something is a joke or a secret or as a signal of affection or greeting. As for the word "nictate" I've never seen it, so I cannot simply help you with it. Wait for native speakers anyway.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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    #3

    Re: blink v. nictate v. wink

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    The studio was an aquarium of light; the woman and the girl blinked in the glare."

    Can we say following instead of original?

    1) The studio was aquarium of light; the woman and the girl nictated in the glare.

    2) The studio was aquarium of light; the woman and the girl winked in the glare.

    Source:
    Second Deadly Sin by by Lawrence Sanders.

    Thank you.
    No. Nictate is a technical term which would be technically correct but very unnatural. To wink means to close one eye while looking at another person in order to communicate an idea.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: blink v. nictate v. wink

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Nictate is a technical term which would be technically correct but very unnatural.
    Very!

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    #5

    Re: blink v. nictate v. wink

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    No. Nictate is a technical term which would be technically correct but very unnatural. To wink means to close one eye while looking at another person in order to communicate an idea.
    Then even wink and blink are not the same in meaning, aren't they?

    Thank you.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: blink v. nictate v. wink

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    Then even wink and blink are not the same in meaning, aren't they?
    They are not.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: blink v. nictate v. wink

    You wink with one eye at a time.
    You blink with both eyes at the same time.

    If you wink, one eye is open and one is shut.
    If you blink, both eyes are shut.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: blink v. nictate v. wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    If my memory serves me correctly the verb "wink" means to close and open one eye quickly, typically to indicate that something is a joke or a secret or as a signal of affection or greeting. As for the word "nictate" I've never seen it, so I cannot simply help you with it. Wait for native speakers anyway.
    Should wink always have a special meaning and to be happened deliberately? Blink can have a special meaning or signal as wink have? Can to blink appear deliberately for a special reason such as a signal?

    Thank you.

    Thank you.

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    #9

    Re: blink v. nictate v. wink

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    Should wink always have a special meaning and to be happened deliberately? Blink can have a special meaning or signal as wink have? Can to blink appear deliberately for a special reason such as a signal?
    Winks are usually directed at someone: she winked at him flirtatiously. Blinking is usually automatic, but can be used as a signal: ​blink twice if you want me to interrupt you.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #10

    Re: blink v. nictate v. wink

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    Does Should "wink" always have a special meaning? Is winking always understood to beand to be happened deliberately? Can a blink Blink can have a special meaning or be a signal as like a wink can? Can to blinking appear deliberately or be used for a special reason such as a signal?

    Thank you.
    Note my suggestions above.
    I am not a teacher.

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