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    #1

    Are having to..

    "For people wondering what the heck I'm on about with 'fronted adverbials' - and why it matters is this:

    1. Very young children are having to learn what 'fronted adverbials' are and then to make their writing supposedly better, use them in their writing."

    why have they used ' are having to'(progressive-are plus verb-ing) instead of 'have to' and please explain to me the grammatical structure used here. Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 10-Jul-2016 at 19:22. Reason: Reduced unnecessarily large font

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Are having to..

    I have to.
    I must.
    Someone is forcing me to do something.

    Teacher: You have to learn this.
    The children have to learn this.

    Children are having to learn this = it's widespread and repeated.

    Better would be "Children are being made to learn" or "Children are being required to learn."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: Are having to..

    The text was probably written by someone for whom English is a second language. I would guess further that the person learned English on the Indian sub-continent, where continuous tenses are used in places that look inappropriate to American and British English speakers.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Are having to..

    www.usingenglish.com/forum/threads/205198-be-having-to?p=1053399#post1053399
    Having read 5jj's explanation above, I think 'are having to' can be used in a context like 'The children are having to learn this this week according to the schedule'.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Are having to..

    'an ongoing present situation of limited duration' - brilliant! This guy must've been a teacher

    b

    PS I disagree with #3 - it sounds fine to me.
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    #6

    Re: Are having to..

    The phrase ...are having to... is a present continuous form. It's widely and commonly used in this kind of sentence that describes a social trend, even with stative verbs.

    Barb D's alternative phrasing of ...are being required to learn... is another clear example of this usage of the present continuous.

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    #7

    Re: Are having to..

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    PS I disagree with #3 - it sounds fine to me.
    On reflection, I also disagree with that post, even though I wrote it. I didn't fill in the missing comma after between "then" and "to" in the OP; without the comma, I read the sentence as a somewhat clumsy effort by a non-native Anglophone.
    I am not a teacher.

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