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    #1

    There´s a good chap

    Hello,

    May I use the phrase there´s a good chap when I am talking to a girl?

    "There´s a good chap, young lady, calm down and tell me what happened."

    Thank you very much.
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    #2

    Re: There´s a good chap

    No, except perhaps ironically. A chap is a male.
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    #3

    Re: There´s a good chap

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    A chap is a male.
    So, if I want to use the idiom in a conversation with a girl, I have to use a soul instead of a chap, don´t I?

    "There´s a good soul, Emma, and shut your mouth."

    Thanks for help.
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    #4

    Re: There´s a good chap

    Either word would be unnatural in AmE. You may want to wait and see what speakers of other dialects say.
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    #5

    Re: There´s a good chap

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Either word would be unnatural in AmE.
    The truth is that I have come across the idiom chiefly in an older British literature. The last instance, as long as I can remember, was in The Ghost Pirates by W.H.Hodgson, 1909.

    "I could stand anything, but this being alone. There's a good chap, don't pretend you don't understand. Tell me what it all means. What is this horrible man that I've twice seen?"

    So we shall see what the others have to say.
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  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: There´s a good chap

    We use "There's a good girl" seriously to a female child (to praise or to plead!) but generally sarcastically to a female adult. I'm more concerned by your plan to tell her to "shut your mouth". It really doesn't matter what you use at the start of the sentence. If you end it like that, you're likely to get a less than friendly response.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: There´s a good chap

    It all depends on the circumstances. I think the sentence is adequate if you are talking to an unfaithful woman who is trying to persuade you hysterically she has not been carrying on with your neighbourg though you know she definitely has.

    Nevertheless, thank you very much, there´s a good girl is exactly what I am looking for.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 10-Jul-2016 at 22:48.
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  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: There´s a good chap

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnyxxx View Post
    It all depends on the circumstances. I think the sentence is adequate if you are talking to an unfaithful woman who is trying to persuade you hysterically she has not been carrying on with your neibourg neighbour/neighbor though you know she definitely has.
    That's not the first context I think of when I'm helping English learners!

    Nevertheless, thank you very much, there´s a good girl is exactly what I am looking for.
    See above.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: There´s a good chap

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnyxxx View Post
    I think the sentence is adequate if you are talking to an unfaithful woman who is trying to persuade you hysterically she has not been carrying on with your neighbourg though you know she definitely has.

    Nevertheless, thank you very much, there´s a good girl is exactly what I am looking for.
    Maybe she's carrying on with the neighbour because he doesn't treat her like a little girl; and maybe the only way she knows to communicate with you - hysterically - is by acting like one.

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    #10

    Re: There´s a good chap

    The only context I'd use "good/bad girl/boy' in AmE is in praising and training an animal. I might use 'good boy/girl' with a very small infant. I'd probably stop using it once I thought the child could understand me (versus just understanding my tone), and switch to something like 'good job' for praise.

    Unless of course I was trying to be especially demeaning to somebody with negative praise.

    I'd never use 'chap', unless I was trying to do a bad British accent.
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