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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    Train pulled up in the New York.

    "Tom deboarded the train when train pulled up in the New York station."

    Please check.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Train pulled up in the New York.

    Tom alighted from the train when it stopped at the New York station.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Skrej's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Train pulled up in the New York.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    "Tom deboarded the train when train pulled up in the New York station."

    Please check.

    Check your articles before we look any further at your sentence.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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    #4

    Re: Train pulled up in the New York.

    Correction for post# 1.

    "Tom deboarded the train when the train pulled up in the New York station."

    Please check.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Train pulled up in the New York.

    As MatthewWai showed, we don't use "deboarded" and there's no need to repeat "the train".

    John alighted from the train when it pulled into New York station.
    John got off the train when it arrived at New York station.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Key Member
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    #6

    Re: Train pulled up in the New York.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    As MatthewWai showed, we don't use "deboarded" and there's no need to repeat "the train".

    John alighted from the train when it pulled into New York station.
    John got off the train when it arrived at New York station.
    Does "pulled into" means stop?

  7. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Train pulled up in the New York.

    I take it to mean 'arrived at'.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. Skrej's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Train pulled up in the New York.

    Yes, it means arrived at, but it also means stopped at.

    'Pulled into' implies that the train is gradually slowing down to a complete stop at the station.

    For example, my friend who's expecting me to pick him up might call and ask where I'm at, and I could say "I'm pulling into your driveway now", or "I'm pulling up to your place now".
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  9. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Train pulled up in the New York.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    Yes, it means arrived at, but it also means stopped at.
    What is the difference between 'arrived at' and 'stopped at' in this context?
    Could the train not have stopped when it arrived?
    I am not a teacher.

  10. Skrej's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Train pulled up in the New York.

    Yes, that's what it means in this context. There isn't any difference in this context.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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