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      • Native Language:
      • Russian
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    #1

    Out of VS from

    Here are several sentences from dictionaries:
    Lisa took a folder out of the safe and put it on her desk.
    Take the cake out of the box and cut it into 6 pieces.
    Helen took a lipstick out of her purse.
    And
    The policeman drew a gun from the holster.
    Barbara fetched a tissue from her purse.
    The man took a knife from his pocket.

    So, can I say that out of and from are interchangeable in this context? Thats these sentences are ok:
    Lisa took a folder from the safe and put it on her desk.
    Take the cake from the box and cut it into 6 pieces.
    Helen took a lipstick from her purse.
    And
    The policeman drew a gun out of the holster.
    Barbara fetched a tissue out of her purse.
    The man took a knife out of his pocket.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
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      • British English
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    #2

    Re: Out of VS from

    In the sentences you gave, they are interchangeable.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: Out of VS from

    They are interchangeable in that they describe the same basic events, but there are subtle differences of focus and effect.

    from is basically used to identify a place of origin:


    • The man took a knife from his pocket.


    Here I'd say we're focusing on the knife, and where the man had been keeping it.


    out of is basically used to describe a change of location, from being inside something to being outside, often with a sense of 'release'.


    • The man took a knife out of his pocket.


    I think here we're focusing on the sudden presence of the knife. It doesn't matter so much where he took it from. This phrasing has a more threatening effect.

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