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    #1

    on a bicycle

    1) I can overtake him on a bicycle even I don't run at my top speed.

    2) I can overtake him on a bicycle by running.

    3) I can overtake him on a bicycle.

    In all cases 'he' is on the bicycle.

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: on a bicycle

    They are all unnatural.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: on a bicycle

    Is it natural to say 'I can run faster than him riding a bicycle'?
    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: on a bicycle

    I can overtake him riding a bicycle/cycling by running.

    'I can run faster than him riding a bicycle'
    I think the sentence is OK but has a different meaning.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: on a bicycle

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    I can overtake him riding a bicycle/cycling by running.


    I think the sentence is OK but has a different meaning.
    Your reader will think you are the one riding a bicycle until they get to the end. Then they have to go back and re-read to understand that "he" is on the bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    Is it natural to say 'I can run faster than him riding a bicycle'?
    Both are better as:
    I can run faster than he can ride a bicycle.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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