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    #1

    Would mean

    The following sentence is from the Metro newspaper.
    "the introduction of the death penalty would mean the end of accession negotiations."

    What is the grammatical function of would in the sentence?
    Can you use will in the sentence without changing its meaning?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 19-Jul-2016 at 20:23. Reason: Reduced font size to make post readable

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    #2

    Re: Would mean

    Quote Originally Posted by jigneshbharati View Post
    The following sentence is from the Metro newspaper.
    "The introduction of the death penalty would mean the end of accession negotiations."

    What is the grammatical function of "would" in the sentence?
    Can you use "will" in the sentence without changing its meaning?


    Would is a modal auxiliary that casts the following verb into the conditional mood. As written, the sentence means that the negotiations will cease if the country in question introduces the death penalty. The country has not introduced the penalty and negotiations are ongoing.

    If you replace would with will, the meaning changes. Now the writer and reader know that the country has already introduced the death penalty, and the negotiations will definitely end.
    I am not a teacher.

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