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    #1

    Tina has eaten little these days.

    Ivy: Tina has eaten little these days.
    Amy: ____________. They are losing a few pounds.
    (A) Neither has Grace
    (B) So has Grace
    The answer to the above question is option A. Is option B also acceptable?
    I need native speakers' help.

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Tina has eaten little these days.

    I would go for B because 'Tina has eaten little these days' is not a negative statement.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Tina has eaten little these days.

    'Tina has eaten little these days' is not a natural sentence. I would go so far as to call it ungrammatical.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Tina has eaten little these days.

    No, but the concept is negative, as in a recent thread. But I wouldn't use either, because there are arguments against both, and they both sound unnatural. Nevertheless B should be the answer on a grammatical quiz.
    I might say "Grace too". In fact "Tina has eaten little these days" is unnatural itself.

    Crossposted

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    #5

    Re: Tina has eaten little these days.

    Am I alone in thinking that a) is the logical/more likely answer?

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    #6

    Re: Tina has eaten little these days.

    In Taiwan, students are taught to answer such questions with option A. The reason is as follows:
    There are several adverbs and determiners which are negative in meaning but not in form. They include: seldom, rarely; scarcely, hardly, barely; little, few (in contrast to the positive a little and a few) They can effect clause negation: for example sentences in which they appear generally require a positive tag question.
    I need native speakers' help.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Tina has eaten little these days.

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    'Tina has eaten little these days' is not a natural sentence.
    I guess it is a literal translation from the OP's native language.
    Is it natural to say 'Tina has not eaten much these days'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Am I alone in thinking that a) is the logical/more likely answer?
    Having read the following comment, I think English could sometimes be illogical.
    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    There is nothing logical about 'More than one' being followed by a singular noun which takes a singular verb. 'More than one person' is logically at least two people.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: Tina has eaten little these days.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    Is it natural to say 'Tina has not eaten much these days'?
    'These days' might be better incorporated into the present perfect sense ('sense', I said, not 'tense') by adding a few adjectives: 'She's had a lot of bad luck these last few days'. 'These days' more often means 'now' in the larger sense, and appears with present simple or the progressive tenses: 'These days we see a lot of homeless cats in the park'; 'I've been seeing a lot of her these days'; 'I'm not studying so much these days'.
    https://www.englishforums.com/Englis.../ldrm/post.htm
    I need native speakers' help.

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Tina has eaten little these days.

    Correction: Tina does not eat much these days.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #10

    Re: Tina has eaten little these days.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    Correction: Tina does not eat much these days.
    Yes, but that's trivial. You answer with "Neither does Grace."
    But the original sentence states what Tina does (eats little these days), not what she doesn't do.

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