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    #1

    Learning with a quiet heart

    Hi all,

    Is it normal to say "I am learning with a quiet heart"? To me, it seems that it is not my heart that is learning. It is in fact my brain which is learning. So maybe I should say "I am learning with a peaceful mind"? Or is there an alternative way for expressing this meaning which sounds more natural to a native speaker?

    Thanks!
    Thank you!

    JY

    I am not a teacher

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Learning with a quiet heart

    If the OP was thinking about ď靜心學習Ē in his/her native language, I would translate it as 'studying intently and quietly'.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Learning with a quiet heart

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    'studying intently and quietly'.
    That's grammatically correct, but, if you are studying intently, it goes without saying that you are studying quietly, and so I would omit the last two words.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Learning with a quiet heart

    Given the thread title, I guess the OP wants to emphasize 'quiet'.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: Learning with a quiet heart

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    That's grammatically correct, but, if you are studying intently, it goes without saying that you are studying quietly, and so I would omit the last two words.
    When I was a boy, my best friend's younger brother had extremely loud vocal tics. We called his most common one "motoring" because it was a very loud, low hum like the sound of an engine. The more intent he was on an activity, the louder he got. He was not capable of being simultaneously quiet and intent.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Learning with a quiet heart

    A student might read a textbook aloud while studying intently.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: Learning with a quiet heart

    Matthew is right. This is a Chinese expression. Actually this is the education philosophy of a school. It is a requirement of the school that its students should learn with a "quiet heart". But I think there is no such saying in English and I wonder how it would sound more natural in English. What it means is that the students should stay focused and should not think about other things when learning. So I guess "intently" is the right word here.
    Thank you!

    JY

    I am not a teacher

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    #8

    Re: Learning with a quiet heart

    Apparently, Chinese expressions for one's mental state or mood are centred round the "heart" whereas the same expressions in English have more to do with the mind.
    I think "learn with a quiet heart" is equivalent to "learn/approach a problem with a calm mind(free of distractions, worries,etc)" in English.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Learning with a quiet heart

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    "learn with a quiet heart"
    I suspect it doesn't make sense to native speakers because they haven't responded to it in this thread.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Piscean's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Learning with a quiet heart

    Have GS and I suddenly become non-native speakers?

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