Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 4,585
    #1

    He heard someone speak/shout/call his name.

    "He heard somebody shout his name."

    "He heard somebody call his name."

    "He heard someone speak his name."

    "He heard two three people call his name."

    "He heard two three people shout his name."

    Please check.

  2. Skrej's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 2,397
    #2

    Re: He heard someone speak/shout/call his name.

    The last two have a problem. I'm not sure what you mean by 'two three' - is that supposed to be 'two or three'? "Two to three"?
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  3. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 4,585
    #3

    Re: He heard someone speak/shout/call his name.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    The last two have a problem. I'm not sure what you mean by 'two three' - is that supposed to be 'two or three'? "Two to three"?
    Two or three.

    Is there any difference in meaning of these sentences?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,305
    #4

    Re: He heard someone speak/shout/call his name.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    Two or three.

    Is there any difference in meaning of these sentences?
    Yes. A dictionary will help you discover the differences between shout or call (which are near synonyms) and speak. The words someone and somebody are synonyms meaning a person. This obviously does not mean the same thing as two or three people.
    I am not a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 3,321
    #5

    Re: He heard someone speak/shout/call his name.

    "Speak his name" sounds strange to me.
    I am not a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,305
    #6

    Re: He heard someone speak/shout/call his name.

    Yes. Say his name would be natural.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 4,585
    #7

    Re: He heard someone speak/shout/call his name.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Yes. Say his name would be natural.
    I heard it in the movie "Harry potter". "We do not speak his name" so is it incorrect?

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #8

    Re: He heard someone speak/shout/call his name.

    It's not incorrect. It means exactly the same as "We do not say his name". It's simply a particular style that the writer chose to use.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,305
    #9

    Re: He heard someone speak/shout/call his name.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    I heard it in the movie "Harry potter". "We do not speak his name" so is it incorrect?
    The screenwriter chose the unusual style for dramatic effect.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #10

    Re: He heard someone speak/shout/call his name.

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    "Harry Potter"
    Note the correct capitalisation above. There were two reasons you should have known to do this:

    1. It's the title of a book/film and we have told you many times to capitalise all the main words in titles.
    2. It's the name of a person (first name and surname), both of which must be capitalised even when they're not a book/film title.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] Heard him Sing vs Heard him singing
    By Sahil Dhankhar in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-Oct-2014, 17:19
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-Sep-2014, 03:21
  3. I heard a thunder. / I heard the thuder.
    By englishhobby in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28-Feb-2013, 20:04
  4. accustomed to speak and be heard.
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-Dec-2011, 15:14
  5. [Vocabulary] to talk; to shout; to speak; to whisper
    By Tullia in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Aug-2010, 17:47

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •