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    #1

    accusation v. annoyance v. charge v. complaint

    Original: Some of the complaints about the pedestrian environment arise because of their implications for traffic safety.

    Which of the following is correct, idiomatic and in the same sense as the original?

    1) Some of the accusations about the pedestrian environment arise because of their implications for traffic safety.

    2) Some of the annoyances about the pedestrian environment arise because of their implications for traffic safety.

    3) Some of the charges about the pedestrian environment arise because of their implications for traffic safety.

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: accusation v. annoyance v. charge v. complaint

    None of those sentences, including the original, makes good sense. What do you mean by "their"?

    The words in bold all have significantly different uses, so you can't make them all fit into the same slot of a single sentence.

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    #3

    Re: accusation v. annoyance v. charge v. complaint

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    None of those sentences, including the original, makes good sense. What do you mean by "their"?

    The words in bold all have significantly different uses, so you can't make them all fit into the same slot of a single sentence.
    Isn't it clear that "their" means "pedestrian environment" ?

    Thank you.

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    #4

    Re: accusation v. annoyance v. charge v. complaint

    No.

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    #5

    Re: accusation v. annoyance v. charge v. complaint

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    Isn't it clear that "their" means "pedestrian environment" ?

    Thank you.
    No. Simplify the sentence to see why not: Some of the accusations arise because of their implications.

    You need a different pronoun to refer to "pedestrian environment":

    Some of the accusations about the pedestrian environment arise because of its implications for traffic safety.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: accusation v. annoyance v. charge v. complaint

    Re-opening

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    #7

    Re: accusation v. annoyance v. charge v. complaint

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    None of those sentences, including the original, makes good sense. What do you mean by "their"?

    The words in bold all have significantly different uses, so you can't make them all fit into the same slot of a single sentence.
    Would you please explain the part "makes good sense"?

    Thank you.

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    #8

    Re: accusation v. annoyance v. charge v. complaint

    It simply means "makes sense".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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