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  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #1

    stow versus store

    I am a bit confused by the different definitions Cambridge and Longman online dictionaries give for the word 'stow'. The Longman's definition is 'to put or pack something tidily away in a space until you need it again[= stash]') while the Cambridge definition is 'to store something'. What is the difference between the two words? Am I right in thinking that 'stowing' implies more care than just 'storing'?
    Last edited by englishhobby; 31-Jul-2016 at 11:01.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

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    #2

    Re: stow versus store

    These two words have many uses- especially store, so there is a lot of overlap.

    I think you come close to a difference with "until you need it again" We stow things we will use again, but we store bulk items to be consumed a bit at a time. Stored items generally will not be returned to storage.

    I tend also to think of stow as a nautical term. Everything on a boat must be kept in the most efficient way possible, so some things we might leave out at home must be put away after each use at sea.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: stow versus store

    The only place I hear the word "stow" these days is on a plane. The announcements use it in "Please stow your hand luggage in the overhead locker or under the seat in front of you". I am aware that it is also used as a nautical term but it's a long time since I've travelled by boat/ship.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: stow versus store

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post

    Stored items generally will not be returned to storage.
    And how about storing/stowing old things in the attic? Are they stored or stowed there? (Some of them may come in handy one day.)
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: stow versus store

    For me, they're stored or kept there (or hidden away!)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: stow versus store

    That's right- some expressions used in air travel were appropriated from sailing terms. Bulkhead, cabin, steward, and galley come to mind- I'm sure there must be others.

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    #7

    Re: stow versus store

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    That's right- some expressions used in air travel were appropriated from sailing terms. Bulkhead, cabin, steward, and galley come to mind- I'm sure there must be others.
    Some airlines have pursers. Airplanes operate under the command of a captain, who's assisted by a first officer. The person operating the controls is the pilot, who keeps the aircraft in trim.
    I am not a teacher.

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