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    #1

    He was not due at the office for another three-quarters of an hour.

    He was not due at the office for another three-quarters of an hour.

    I read this sentence in the COLLIN'S COBUILD USAGE. But I don't quite understand what it means. Does it mean 'He was not expected/supposed to be at the office for another 45 minutes'? or put in another way, 'People thought/believed he wouldn't be at the office for another 45 minutes'?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He was not due at the office for another three-quarters of an hour.

    "He is due to arrive in 45 minutes" could mean that it's the time his shift starts or that it's the time he has previously told someone he would arrive. There is no expectation that he will arrive any sooner than that. Of course, he might not arrive on time, he might be early, he might be late or he might not even arrive at all.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: He was not due at the office for another three-quarters of an hour.

    Thank you so much, moderator. I understand the sentence "He is due to arrive in 45 minutes". But I still can't get to understand the negative sentence "He is not due to arrive in 45 minutes". Does it mean 'He won't arrive in 45 minutes'? Or something else?

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: He was not due at the office for another three-quarters of an hour.

    "He is not due to arrive for another 45 minutes" means "He is not likely to be here any sooner than in 45 minutes".

    It's the use of "for another" that makes the negative possible.

    He is due to arrive in 45 minutes.
    He is not due to arrive for another 45 minutes.

    We usually use the "negative + for another" construction as a response to someone suggesting that he might be coming earlier.

    John: Shall I make coffee ready for Sarah's arrival?
    Tim: Not yet. She's not due for another 45 minutes! The coffee will be cold by the time she gets here if you make it now.

    Sam: I can't wait to see my sister. She's flying in from Canada today and I haven't seen her for two years. I think she'll be walking up the front path in about two hours.
    Hilary: Don't get too excited! Her plane's not due to land for another two hours and it'll take her another hour and a half to get here after that.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: He was not due at the office for another three-quarters of an hour.

    Thank you very much, moderator, Piscean and Rover. I've got to understand the sentence. 'He is due to arrive in 45 minutes' is equal to 'He is not due to arrive for another 45 minutes'.

    (The Thank and Like buttons won't work on my page.)

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