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    #1

    Borrow it did abundantly

    Borrow it did abundantly, and in the 13th and 14th centuries this development produced what is called Middle English, known especially from Chaucer, who died in 1400. (Wheelock's Latin, 6th edition, page xxxi)

    What does Borrow it did abundantly mean in the above sentence?
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #2

    Re: Borrow it did abundantly

    Please quote the previous sentence.

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    #3

    Re: Borrow it did abundantly

    Some two centuries later, however, as the descendants of the Normans finally amalgamated with the English natives, the Anglo-Saxon language reasserted itself; but in its poverty it had to borrow hundreds of French words (literary, intellectual, and cultural) before it could become the language of literature.
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #4

    Re: Borrow it did abundantly

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    Some two centuries later, however, as the descendants of the Normans finally amalgamated with the English natives, the Anglo-Saxon language reasserted itself; but in its poverty it had to borrow hundreds of French words (literary, intellectual, and cultural) before it could become the language of literature.
    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    Borrow it did abundantly, and in the 13th and 14th centuries this development produced what is called Middle English, known especially from Chaucer, who died in 1400. (Wheelock's Latin, 6th edition, page xxxi)

    What does Borrow it did abundantly mean in the above sentence?
    The author could have written It did borrow from French. It borrowed abundantly. I would have used a comma after "did": Borrow it did [from French], abundantly.
    I am not a teacher.

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