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  1. rock-onn's Avatar
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    #1

    hears/is hearing

    She hears the music. Here, hears is a non-continuous verb. Why?

    She is hearing voices. Here, hearing is normal verb.

    Why hears in first sentence is a non-continuous verb?

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: hears/is hearing

    'hear
    2 [transitive] (not used in the progressive tenses)'── quoted from http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionarie...sh/hear?q=hear
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: hears/is hearing

    'Continuous' describes a tense, not a verb. 'Hears' is not a non-continuous verb, because such a thing doesn't exist unless you are making up a new definition.
    Your first sentence is in the simple present tense.
    You second example sentence is in the present continuous tense. However, both use the same verb - 'to hear'.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: hears/is hearing

    Like many verbs that learners are told should not be in the continuous tense, "hear" can be in the continuous when it's new and believed to be temporary.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. rock-onn's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: hears/is hearing

    Before you begin the verb tense lessons, it is extremely important to understand that NOT all English verbs are the same. English verbs are divided into three groups: Normal Verbs, Non-Continuous Verbs, and Mixed Verbs.

    http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/types.html
    Please read above link.

    The examples I qouted is listed in this page.

    I just wish to know why hears is non continuous verb.
    Thanks

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: hears/is hearing

    Whatever that page might say (the link doesn't work), it is perfectly possible to use "hear" in the continuous.

    A. Where is your cousin?
    B. Unfortunately, she's in the local psychiatric hospital.
    A. Oh no! Why?
    B. She's having some psychological problems.
    A. Like what?
    B. She hears voices, has hallucinations and thinks everyone is trying to kill her.

    A. Is that your cousin?
    B. Yes, that's her.
    A. Why is she banging her head against the wall and holding her hands over her ears?
    B. I think she's hearing voices. It's one of the symptoms of her psychological problems.

    In the first dialogue, the present simple is used to describe a regular, habitual issue. In the second dialogue, B is talking about exactly what is happening at the time of speaking.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: hears/is hearing

    Quote Originally Posted by rock-onn View Post

    http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/types.html
    Please read above link.
    OK, well someone has made a new classification of verbs. That can't be prevented. Unfortunately, they don't define what a non-continuous verb is - though they do give two characteristics that sometimes apply to them.
    (I assume from the above replies that a non-continuous verb is one that should not be used in a continuous tense unless you know what you're doing.)
    Last edited by Raymott; 01-Aug-2016 at 18:33.

  8. Piscean's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: hears/is hearing

    I find that page misleading and unhelpful. Learners who read it may believe that some perfectly correct forms are incorrect.

  9. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: hears/is hearing

    I don't have a problem with "She isn't feeling well".
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  10. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: hears/is hearing

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiral View Post
    My ESL adults asked me about this back in the day. I had to look it up, but it seems that you should typically avoid using the present progressive for most verbs relating to senses (hear, see, smell, feel). Raymott, my students' response was about the same as yours. "Now we have a new rule to remember?"
    Yes, there's no argument that some verbs are less often used in the continuous tense than other verbs. I'm not used to hearing them called them "non-continuous" verbs though, since they can be used in the continuous tense.

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