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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jul 2004
    • Posts: 285
    #1

    what did you do for them to...

    a. What did you do for them to win the game?
    b. What did you do in order for them to win the game?


    Do these mean
    1. What did you do in order that they should win the game? (It is assumed that your intention was to make them win the game, but one cannot tell whether they won or not)
    or
    2. What did you do so that they did win the game. (They won the game, but maybe it was not your intention to make them win)
    ?


    Many thanks.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #2

    Re: what did you do for them to...

    99% of the time, "in order" can be deleted in the phrases "in order to" and "in order for."

    Neither of those sentences sounds natural to me.

    How did you help them win the game?
    What did you do that let them/helped them/enabled them to win the game?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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