Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: May 2013
    • Posts: 1,099
    #1

    To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult

    I've just found this strange sentence in my grammar book called "English Grammar Today Workbook by Cambridge".
    Honestly, I have no the slightest idea what it is supposed to mean. If you're wondering whether it's a standalone setence or not - yes, it is.

    To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,809
    #2

    Re: To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult

    It would have been difficult to have asked Julio for his help.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: May 2013
    • Posts: 1,099
    #3

    Re: To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult

    What is the point of "have asked"? Why would somebody say something like this? Does it mean the same as "it'd have been difficult to ask Julio for his help"?
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,809
    #4

    Re: To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult

    I have asked Julio for his help because I have his number.
    It would have been difficult to have asked Julio for his help if I had lost his number.
    To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult if I had lost his number.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: May 2013
    • Posts: 1,099
    #5

    Re: To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult

    I'd not say something like this.

    If I had lost Julio's number, it would have been difficult to ask him for help.

    What's the difference between "to have asked" and "to ask" in the sentece above?
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,809
    #6

    Re: To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult

    The perfect infinitive denotes you have already done so.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,829
    #7

    Re: To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult

    In BrE, it would be acceptable to say "It would have been difficult to ask Julio for his help".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,281
    #8

    Re: To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    What is the point of "have asked"? Why would somebody say something like this? Does it mean the same as "it would it'd have been difficult to ask Julio for his help"?
    Note my correction above.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 9,939
    #9

    Re: To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post

    If I had lost Julio's number, it would have been difficult to ask him for help.
    That is perfectly correct, and more logical than the sentence with the perfect infinitive.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Dec 2011
    • Posts: 176
    #10

    Re: To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    I've just found this strange sentence in my grammar book called "English Grammar Today Workbook by Cambridge".
    Honestly, I have no the slightest idea what it is supposed to mean. If you're wondering whether it's a standalone setence or not - yes, it is.

    To have asked Julio for his help would have been difficult.
    Back to the original sentence though, I would say that it makes perfect sense as a standalone sentence. In my opinion, it means that the author of these words did not, in fact, ask Julio for his help although he might have done it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    What is the point of "have asked"? Why would somebody say something like this? Does it mean the same as "it'd have been difficult to ask Julio for his help"?
    This is, again, to emphasize that something that might have happened did not happen, as opposed to the 'general theory', as it were, that 'it would have been difficult to ask Julio'.

    Not a teacher.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [General] We have been asked
    By suniljain in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 31-Oct-2015, 11:38
  2. [General] I find it difficult/It's difficult for me
    By kompstar in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 15-Feb-2015, 21:49
  3. more difficult than / difficult compared with
    By herbivorie in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Jun-2014, 18:53
  4. if asked =? if you are/were asked?
    By JACEK1 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-May-2013, 22:16
  5. [Grammar] it is difficult (for us), we will find it /us difficult
    By uktous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Dec-2009, 00:53

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •