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    #1

    untangle when caught? rungs of the chair?


    A child sitting Indian style facing the back of a chair, gets his slippers caught between the seat and one of the rungs exclaims, "My slippers are caught."

    Me: "Figure it out".

    I was going to say Untangle them, but thought untangle might not be the correct term for the action, as we say the slippers as caught, not tangled. What's a good word to use?

    Also, are those called rungs?
    Not a teacher.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: untangle when caught? rungs of the chair?

    I would call them rungs, and personally, I think "You need to figure it out" is exactly the right thing to say.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: untangle when caught? rungs of the chair?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I would call them rungs, and personally, I think "You need to figure it out" is exactly the right thing to say.
    I thought so, too. But just for the sake of it, do you untangle your slippers from the chair? Oh, I just realized free​ would be a better word. Is it not?
    Not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: untangle when caught? rungs of the chair?

    To me, 'rungs' are almost always associated with ladders.

    In this context, I'd call them slats.

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    #5

    Re: untangle when caught? rungs of the chair?

    A little Googling tells me that chairmakers call those horizontal supports stretchers.​ This isn't part of everyday vocabulary though.
    I am not a teacher.

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