Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Gujarati
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 85
    #1

    Be a citizen

    Change begins here: Be a Citizen Reporter with TOI. I saw this headline in the Times of India. Could someone please explain to me the grammar and use of " be" in the context? What type of sentence is this? And when do we use this type of sentences?

  1. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 10,010
    #2

    Re: Be a citizen

    'Be' is the imperative form of the verb BE.
    Last edited by Piscean; 05-Aug-2016 at 15:09. Reason: typo

  2. englishhobby's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1,681
    #3

    Re: Be a citizen

    Quote Originally Posted by jigneshbharati View Post
    Could someone please explain to me the grammar and use of " be" in the context? What type of sentence is this? And when do we use this type of sentences?

    NOTE: I am a Non-NEST (a non-native English-speaking teacher):

    I think the title of the article is an invitation to take up a job. It is inviting to become (or to be) a citizen reporter. The elements of this structure are: 1) no subject, 2) the infinitive of the verb without to. This structure is used to give orders and make requests.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  3. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 10,010
    #4

    Re: Be a citizen

    The structure used to give orders is know as the imperative. It has the same form (in the affirmative but not the negative) as the bare infinitive, but it has a subject ('you') that is normally implied, though it can be present.

Similar Threads

  1. Though (being) an American citizen, he . . .
    By ademoglu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-May-2015, 15:20
  2. senior citizen homes
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15-Sep-2013, 01:34
  3. Kept citizen
    By Dr.Appalayya in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Sep-2009, 05:37
  4. citizen/denizen
    By cocokpl in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2009, 00:14
  5. citizen of ....
    By GUEST2008 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 27-Feb-2009, 00:34

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •