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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    "porter" and "trolley" in US airports...?

    Hi there,

    In US, when in an airport ith heavy luggage, which exact help point should one go to ask for assistance (a porter?!) or a trolley? Is there any special way of making such a request?

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "porter" and "trolley" in US airports...?

    In AmE porters at airports are called 'skycaps'. They're usually found at the curbside check-in counters where passengers are dropped off.

    Just make eye contact with one of them, and they'll usually offer to help with your luggage. Otherwise just wave at one and ask "Can you help me with my luggage" or "Could I get some help with my bags, please?" They'll of course expect a tip and possibly a fee. Since I've never used one, I can't say how much they cost or what the normal tip amount is.

    You can usually rent luggage carts for a fee as well. Many airports have them in self-service racks for a fee. Again, I've never used one, but I think they typically cost something like $2-3 dollars, but don't quote me on that.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  3. teechar's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "porter" and "trolley" in US airports...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi there,

    If one is in the US , when in at an airport with heavy luggage
    .

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "porter" and "trolley" in US airports...?

    No such person exists at British airports. You can help yourself to a trolley but there aren't any staff you can approach for help with your luggage. If you are elderly or infirm, you can request "Special Assistance" but you have to book this in advance. When you arrive at the airport, you go to the "Special Assistance" desk and give your name and you and your luggage are then transported to the gate on a motorised buggy.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: "porter" and "trolley" in US airports...?

    Note: BrE trolley (airport or supermarket) = AmE cart.

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    #6

    Re: "porter" and "trolley" in US airports...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan
    (a porter?)
    NOT A TEACHER

    Hello, Mehrgan

    If you ever visit the United States, never, ever use the term "porter" to refer to that job classification.

    (When I was young, American trains that had sleeping accommodations had men who were called porters. Their job was to attend to the passengers who had sleeping accommodations. There are still a few sleeper trains left in the United States, but I do not know whether the term "porter" is still used for that job classification. In any event, your using that word at the airport could possibly offend some modern-day skycaps.)

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    #7

    Re: "porter" and "trolley" in US airports...?

    Don't worry about this. The word porter has fallen out of use. No one will know what you mean if you use it, but if you do, you won't offend anyone.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Skrej's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "porter" and "trolley" in US airports...?

    And you could also offend a brewer selling stouts, rather than porters, with roughly the same dastardly consequences.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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    #9

    Re: "porter" and "trolley" in US airports...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    You can usually rent luggage carts for a fee as well. Many airports have them in self-service racks for a fee. Again, I've never used one, but I think they typically cost something like $2-3 dollars, but don't quote me on that.
    I have visited many countries, but I have never paid a cent for a luggage cart.

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    #10

    Re: "porter" and "trolley" in US airports...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    And you could also offend a brewer selling stouts, rather than porters, with roughly the same dastardly consequences.
    According to Wikipedia: While there is a great deal of disagreement in the brewing world on this subject, there are no differences between stout and porter historically (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stout)

    The lack of disagreement sounds very dangerous to me.

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