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  1. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #1

    pass / pass on

    Dear friends,

    When I'm together with a group of people (some are standing quite far from me) and want them in turn to give something to me (e.g., the sheets of paper they've filled in with some information), which of the following phrases should I use:

    1) Please, pass the sheets of paper to me

    2) Please, pass on the sheets of paper to me

    Do "pass" and "pass on" mean the same here, namely sending something to the place the people have been about?

    Thanks

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: pass / pass on

    No, 'pass on' doesn't work here.

    If you're in front of the entire group, you could also say "Pass your papers up to me."
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  3. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: pass / pass on

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    No, 'pass on' doesn't work here.

    If you're in front of the entire group, you could also say "Pass your papers up to me."
    Here is what I've found in the Collins Dictionary:

    "If you pass something on to someone, you give it to them so that they have it instead of you."

    If this explanation is correct (I hope it is since it's from Collins) why can't I say, for example, "pass the sheets of paper on to me"?

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: pass / pass on

    Passing something on usually entails someone else having given it to you first.

    We pass on a family heirloom.
    We pass on our surname to our children (in some cultures).

    If a teacher hands a stack of test papers to the nearest child, he/she might say "Take one test paper and pass the rest on". Each child would take one paper and pass the stack of papers on to the next child.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: pass / pass on

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Passing something on usually entails someone else having given it to you first.
    That's exactly what I meant. For example, I give people sheets of paper with empty spaces and ask them to fill them in. When the papers are ready, people return them to me. In this case can I tell them "to pass the sheets of paper on to me"?


    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If a teacher hands a stack of test papers to the nearest child, he/she might say "Take one test paper and pass the rest on". Each child would take one paper and pass the stack of papers on to the next child.
    Then I can also give all the papers to the person who stands closest to me and ask him "to pass the rest of the papers on to other people"?

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: pass / pass on

    Quote Originally Posted by milan2003_07 View Post
    That's exactly what I meant. For example, I give people sheets of paper with empty spaces and ask them to fill them in. When the papers are ready, people return them to me. In this case can I tell them "to pass the sheets of paper on to me"?
    If you give the sheets to people and you want them to complete them and then give the sheets to you, you would ask them to pass them back to you. In this context, "pass back" means "return".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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