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    #1

    like through a grapevine

    Which are correct:

    1) The news spread as through a grapevine.
    2) The news spread as it would through a grapevine.
    3) The news spread as if through a grapevine.
    4) The news spread like through a grapevine.

  1. Skrej's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: like through a grapevine

    Grammatically, 1-3 are correct, however none of them are at all natural.

    The usual expression is "spread through the grapevine", or even more commonly 'heard (it) through the grapevine".
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: like through a grapevine

    There's also:
    "The news spread like wildfire."
    But that just means it spread very fast. Is that what you're looking for?
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/de...glish/wildfire

  3. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: like through a grapevine

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    Grammatically, 1-3 are correct, however none of them are at all natural.

    The usual expression is "spread through the grapevine", or even more commonly 'heard (it) through the grapevine".
    Is it widely used nowadays? I've never seen such an expression before. If it is commen, I'll definitely memorize it.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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    #5

    Re: like through a grapevine

    not a teacher

    Is it widely used nowadays?

    "through the grapevine"

    I hear it every now and then, along with "on the grapevine". It means that you heard it as you might hear a rumour, or information that spreads informally among people.
    http://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=through+the+grapevine&l=0

    If the speaker would rather keep the specific source of the information secret, they sometimes say, "A (little) birdie told me".
    http://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=birdie+told+me&l=0&t=0&ffo=false&fi ndid=-1&ff=



  4. Skrej's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: like through a grapevine

    I wouldn't say it's very commonly used, although it is still widely recognized.

    I imagine the Marvin Gaye song is probably responsible for it still being familiar, as it was used in a series of commercials promoting California raisins during the late 80's. These singing raisins, for reasons I cannot explain, became wildly popular, resulting in a spinoff carton, as well as lots of merchandise. All I can say is that it was the 80's, and claymation was all the rage.

    I much prefer the term 'scuttlebutt' for these situations, which sadly is rarely used or seen anymore. I'm waging a personal campaign to stimulate its resurgence, by working it into my conversations whenever I can, but it usually just draws blank stares.
    Last edited by Skrej; 10-Aug-2016 at 17:07. Reason: typo
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    #7

    Re: like through a grapevine

    It's in use in BrE. I wouldn't say it's an everyday expression, but it is used when needed.

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    #8

    Re: like through a grapevine

    Here's CCR's version from the 70s.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93S_l0qZrXA

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    #9

    Re: like through a grapevine

    The Dude would have appreciated that. He was a CCR fan.

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    #10

    Re: like through a grapevine

    And he did hate the Eagles.

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