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    #1

    dismissive edge

    "It was the et cetera that gave the dismissive edge."

    What does it mean by "the dismissive edge" ?

    Source: https://books.google.com.tr/books?id...dge%22&f=false by John Le Carre

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: dismissive edge

    The linked page won't display for me, so I can't read the context. The author probably meant that the statement would seem neutral without et cetera; with it, it feels like the speaker is not giving the proposition any serious consideration.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 13-Aug-2016 at 22:23. Reason: Insert a missing space.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. teechar's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: dismissive edge

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    The linked page won't display for me
    Try it now.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=nS...dge%22&f=false

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    #4

    Re: dismissive edge

    Here is the related part.

    "“A lawyer and Russian speaker, Günther. Excellent family. Works for Sanctuary North, a Hamburg foundation. Some of them a bit leftish, but never mind. Do-gooders. Assistance for asylum seekers and illegal immigrants, getting residence for them, helping them with their applications. Et cetera.”

    It was the et cetera that gave the dismissive edge.

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    #5

    Re: dismissive edge

    not a teacher

    "“A lawyer and Russian speaker, Günther. Excellent family. Works for Sanctuary North, a Hamburg foundation. Some of them a bit leftish, but never mind. Do-gooders. Assistance for asylum seekers and illegal immigrants, getting residence for them, helping them with their applications. Et cetera.”

    The suggestion here is that the writer has little respect for the organisation being described. Phrases like "a bit leftish but never mind", and "Do-gooders", establish the disdainful attitude, which is then reinforced by cutting off the list of the group's activities with "Et cetera". It sharpens the generally dismissive tone.

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