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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    Tim's brother will have left for the office.

    "By the time Tim reaches home either his brother will have left for the office or he will have phoned his manager for a day off."

    Please check.

    I would like to know one more thing. We use "will have have" for the things that will have been completed in the future for sure. If there are two possibilities and we are not sure what is going to happen in the future only one thing out of those two can take place then what we have to use instead of "will have done?" Because there is uncertainity and "will have done" denotes certainity.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Tim's brother will have left for the office.

    By the time Tim reaches home either his brother will have either left for the office or (he will have) phoned his manager for a day off.

    You can use may/might have + third form to talk about possibility.

  3. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Tim's brother will have left for the office.

    Piscean, are you basically saying we can say "By the time Tim reaches home his brother might have either left for the office or (he might have) phoned his manager for a day off."

    If this sentence is OK, I'll be very surprised.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Tim's brother will have left for the office.

    What are you surprised at?
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: Tim's brother will have left for the office.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    Piscean, are you basically saying we can say "By the time Tim reaches home his brother might have either left for the office or (he might have) phoned his manager for a day off."

    If this sentence is OK, I'll be very surprised.
    It's fine if you omit the part in parentheses.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Tim's brother will have left for the office.

    I think the part in parentheses is fine if 'either' is omitted.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Key Member
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    #7

    Re: Tim's brother will have left for the office.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    What are you surprised at?
    Boris and I are surprised because there is a perception that "might/may have done" is used for past only.

  7. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Tim's brother will have left for the office.

    It could also refer to the future because Piscean once told me in an old post that the modal perfect refers to an earlier point in time than the time under consideration, where 'the time under consideration' could be a future time.

    I cannot find the old post because the search engine is still not working properly.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. Piscean's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Tim's brother will have left for the office.

    Possibilities of a situation happening before:1. a future time: He may have left when we get there tomorrow.

    2. the present time: He may have left by now.

    3. a past time: He may have left yesterday.

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