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    #1

    comprise/house

    comprise /kəmˋpraiz /
    house /haus/
    How do I know "se"represent z or s in phonetics?

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    #2

    Re: comprise/house

    It's more likely to be z in verbs and s in nouns. "House" is a perfect example: it's a z in to house and an s in ​the house.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 22-Aug-2016 at 14:55. Reason: To promote a semicolon.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: comprise/house

    And it's 'z' in 'houses'.

    Counterexamples to GS:
    Verbs with 's': chase, base, release, increase (etc.)...
    - verbs with stress on first syllable: promise, practise, purchase...
    Nouns with 'z': hose, nose, compromise, reprise, surprise, fuse, phase, phrase, ease...

    There may be some merit in what GS says, but his thesis needs a lot of work.
    My reply to the original question: You don't know.

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    #4

    Re: comprise/house

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    There may be some merit in what GS says, but his thesis needs a lot of work.
    My reply to the original question: You don't know.
    I spoke in haste. I was thinking of cases like house where a verb and a noun are spelled the same but pronounced differently. I'm not sure my thesis applies to more than a handful of such word pairs though.
    I am not a teacher.

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