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    #1

    finish up and end up

    Hello!
    I have trouble with two phrasal verbs: end up and finish up.
    I read my dictionary and phrasal verb guide on this site, but I still don't understand difference between them.

    As far as I understand this phrasal verbs deal with two meanings.

    First: to arrive at a particular place, usually unexpectedly
    We went out for diner and FINISHED UP in a club
    She fled with her children,moving from neighbour to neighbour and ENDING UP in a friend's cellar.

    Second meaning: to be in a particular situation, state, usually without planing or expecting it.
    I wondered where the pictures would END UP after the auction.
    He tried to bribe a police officer and FINISHED UP in jail.

    Both verbs are used with gerund after them.

    I hope you will help me with this problem.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: finish up and end up

    I see no significant difference in meaning between the two

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: finish up and end up

    You could also use "wind up" in that context.
    "I wondered where the pictures would WIND UP after the auction."
    "He tried to bribe a police officer and WOUND UP in jail."

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    #4

    Re: finish up and end up

    "Finished up in jail" doesn't sound natural to my AmE ears unless we're talking about an ongoing activity: ​She started to crochet the scarf at home, but she finished it up in jail.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: finish up and end up

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    ​She started to crochet the scarf at home, but she finished it up in jail.
    Well, that's different. I'd say, "finished it off".

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    #6

    Re: finish up and end up

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Well, that's different. I'd say, "finished it off".
    That would mean she killed it in AmE. Probably with a shank.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: finish up and end up

    First of all, thank you for your replies.
    I'll make a summary to understand the difference.
    So, I know that the phrasal verb "finish off" has four meanings:
    First - to complete smth. (But I really cannot realize what the difference "finish" and "finish off" in this meaning.)
    Second - to eat smth completely.
    Third - to complete event, performance, etc by doing one final thing. E.g., I finished off my the speech by thanking my audience.
    And, finally, fourth - kill sb or smth when they are already weak, or take away sb's energy, strength.

    "Finish up" has another two meanings in addition to what we are discussing about. And both are equal to meaning of "finish of".
    First - to complete smth.
    Second - to eat smth completely.
    It should be difference in American and British English.

    As for "end up" and "finish up", as far as I understand, for American speakers this verbs are not interchangeably, and they use only "end up" in the meanings that I wrote at the begining of the thread. And I can use "wind up" as a synonym of "end up".

    I wrote a lot but still confused.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: finish up and end up

    Quote Originally Posted by Little man View Post
    So, I know that the phrasal verb "finish off" has four meanings:.
    It has one core meaning - to put an end to something or someone. Like nearly all verbs, you can define more precisely what it means in any particular context, but that does not affect the core meaning.

  5. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: finish up and end up

    Little man, be careful. You're supposed to write 'these" with plural nouns and "this" with singular. Not "this verbs" but "these verbs" etc.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  6. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: finish up and end up

    Quote Originally Posted by Little man View Post
    First of all, thank you for your replies.
    I'll make a summary to understand the difference.
    So, I know that the phrasal verb "finish off" has four meanings:
    First - to complete smth. (But I really cannot realize what the difference between "finish" and "finish off" in this meaning is.)
    Second - to eat smth completely.
    Third - to complete event, performance, etc by doing one final thing. E.g., I finished off my the (delete something) speech by thanking my audience.
    And, finally, fourth - kill sb or smth when they are already weak, or take away sb's energy, strength.

    "Finish up" has another two meanings in addition to which we are discussing about. And both mean the same as "finish off".
    First - to complete smth.
    Second - to eat smth completely.
    It should be a difference in between American and British English.

    As for "end up" and "finish up", as far as I understand, for American speakers this these verbs are not interchangeably interchangeable, and they use only "end up" in the meanings that I wrote at the beginning of the thread. And I can use "wind up" as a synonym of for "end up".

    I wrote a lot but I am still confused.
    I have no idea how to cross your mistakes, that's why I've just corrected the most important of them this way (although I understand it's easy to follow at all). Hopefully, native speakers will find some time to show you how to write correctly.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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