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    #1

    Be advised

    I saw the following in my email:
    Please be advised that we’ve scheduled some network maintenance with the Data Communications department on Tuesday 30th August 2016 from 6pm onwards. It is anticipated that this will be no longer than 1 hour.
    Why part of speech does " be advised" belong to ? And when to use this type of construction? I always get confused by " to be" and " being" in my own speech and writing? Is it an example of subjunctive? Please forgive me for any formatting mistakes.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 28-Aug-2016 at 15:20. Reason: Removed formatting to make font readable

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    #2

    Re: Be advised

    'Please be advised that' is an example of business English which is now going out of use. We like to encourage the use of plain English these days.

    You can ignore it and just start reading at 'We've scheduled ....'

    You don't need to use this sort of construction in your own writing, but if you feel the need to add something like this, you could say 'Please note that...' or 'I'd like to inform you that...'

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    #3

    Re: Be advised

    Is it a subjunctive form?

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Be advised

    No. It's imperative.

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    #5

    Re: Be advised

    Is there a clue, rule or tip to identify the subjunctive from the context? How do we know the sentence is imperative? Thanks for your help.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Be advised

    Click to see "imperative sentence" and "subjunctive mood".
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Be advised

    If you have the base form of the verb, and you are being told to do something, or if you have the base form of the verb following Don't and you are being told not to do something, you have an imperative, a command.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 28-Aug-2016 at 16:59. Reason: Fixed typo

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